Rural Farmland Biodiversity

EU Common Agricultural Policy 3-crop rule

https://www.dardni.gov.uk/news/three-crop-rule-don’t-get-caught-out

Our Take: In 2015, the UK’s Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD) implemented a new EU Common Agricultural Policty greening requirement. This rule requires UK farm owners of arable land greater than 30 hectares (~75 acres) to plant 3 crops on their land starting with the autumn rotation, with 2 main crops not to exceed 95% of the arable land. For affected UK growers that can meet Nature’s Crop International’s stringent qualification criteria, Ahiflower represents an excellent solution since it is a true “break crop” in typical rotations involving wheat and oilseed rape. Ahiflower is extemely pollinator friendly whilst not attracting unwanted deer as a forage crop. Even if the 3-crop rule is scrapped in 2016 or later, Ahiflower still presents UK growers with an attractive, ecologically-responsible solution for boosting on-farm revenues.

How Ahiflower Helps: Ahiflower is extremely pollinator-friendly whilst not attracting unwanted deer as a forage crop. Even if the 3-crop rule is scrapped in 2016 or later, Ahiflower still presents UK growers with an attractive, ecologically-responsible solution presenting attractive returns that boost on-farm revenues.

UK farmland biodiversity – where next for market-based mechanisms?

http://www.3keel.com/news/farmland-biodiversity-where-next-market-based-mechanisms

Our Take: With UK farmland biodiversity in continual decline for 40 years (measured by the farmland birds index as one example), pollinator-friendly crops like Ahiflower can contribute measurably to improved farmland biodiversity at a regional scale—in the soil as well as in the sky. Ahiflower crops have proven already to be highly compatible with UK growers’ sowing and harvesting equipment, and have shown good potential to improve on-farm revenues per hectare. Ahiflower is not favored as a forage crop by birds, but it does attract a diverse set of pollinators—who in turn are favored by birds, bats, and reptiles. This combination of low-input requirements and a long blooming cycle can improve habitat biodiversity in the UK, especially as Ahiflower acreage expands to regional scales.

How Ahiflower Helps: Ahiflower’s combination of low-input requirements and a long blooming cycle can improve habitat biodiversity in the UK, especially as Ahiflower acreage expands to regional scales.